What Is Breaking Lines?

Breaking lines is a term used to describe advancing the ball forward between opposition players / units. It is often used when describing penetration of the opposing team in their own defensive half. 

Why do we break lines?

To progress up the pitch and take opposing players out of the game.

When would you break lines?

Possession based teams look to break lines at every opportunity. Against a team that play with a high press and commit attackers forward, a pass that breaks lines into midfield areas for the player to turn puts them in a strong position to create a goalscoring opportunity.

How do you break lines?

By players positioning themselves in between and beyond opposition players gives them a good chance to progress up the pitch.

The pass tends to be firm to prevent opposing players from intercepting.

The receiver should recognise space around themselves in order to decide whether to turn, protect the ball or combine with a team mate.

Technical detail: Passer

‘Punch’ the pass with good weight and accuracy. 

Technical detail: Pass Receiver

Angle – create a clear passing lane.

Body Shape – adapt according to space behind you.

Check Shoulder – identify surroundings.

Decision - to turn, protect or bounce pass.

Execution and End Product – eg. turn, pass, dribble, shoot.

Session Examples for Senior Football and Youth

We have some of examples of coaching practices that can develop your team to break the lines.

TO VIEW AND DOWNLOAD THESE SESSIONS CLICK 'COACHING PRACTICES' ON THE LEFT HAND MENU
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Also known as…

- Penetration

Breaking The Lines
What Is Breaking The Lines?
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